Nestlé scientists find method to cut sugar in chocolate

Cutting down on sugar while keeping their products sweet is the Holy Grail for food giants under pressure from health advocates and governments. Photo: Supplied The discovery of the sweeter sugar could give the KitKat maker an edge over its rivals. Photo: Jason Adlen
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Call it sugar lite.

Global food giant Nestlé announced on Wednesday that it had developed a type of sugar with markedly more sweetness, allowing the company to reduce the amount of sugar in its chocolates and lollies.

“It is sugar, but it is assembled differently so it can disassemble easily in your mouth with less going into your gastrointestinal tract,” said Dr Stefan Catsicas, the company’s chief technology officer.

The discovery could give the KitKat maker an edge as food producers face increasing pressure from governments, health advocates and shoppers to make products healthier.

Big food companies that also include Cadbury chocolates parent Mondelez International and PepsiCo are scrambling to create healthier products to reduce their reliance on treats laden with sugar and salt. It comes as the UK, Mexico and some US cities implement sugar taxes to help fight childhood obesity and diabetes, which affects four times as many people now than in 1980. The World Health Organization has said increasing the price of sugary drinks by 20 per cent would reduce consumption by a fifth.

Locally, both the Australian Medical Association and the Committee of Presidents of Medical Colleges called for a sugar tax to tackle rising rates of obesity last month, fuelling the public debate of a sugar levy. ‘Holy grail’

Nestlé declined to fully explain the process as it is pursuing patents for it. But Catsicas compared a normal crystal of sugar to a shoe box, where the box is made of sugar and everything inside it is also made of sugar. The new sugar, he said, will be processed to have the same sugar exterior – though it may be a globe instead of a box – to dissolve in the mouth. Because less sugar is inside, less goes to the stomach.

Nestlé said the new sugar would be introduced in products starting in 2018, and that more details about it would be released next year.

If the new sugar lives up to its billing, it would represent a milestone in the food business’s never-ending quest for more healthful ways to sweeten products. Nestlé will initially use the product to reduce sugar in its confectionery lines by as much as 40 per cent, Catsicas said.

“Reducing sugar is the Holy Grail of food companies these days – but does it work?” said Marion Nestle, a professor in the department of nutrition, food studies and public health at New York University.

Nestle, who has no connection to the company, said it was impossible to know how much promise the product has, particularly because sweets – which the food business prefers to call “confections” – are not the biggest source of sugar in the diet. The biggest culprits were soft drinks, and then “grain-based desserts”, she said.

Catsicas said Nestlé would have preferred to make the announcement after receiving patents and trademark protection. But he said the news was already leaking, and the company wanted to tell its own story rather than allowing someone else to do so.

Nestlé might eventually sell its new sugar to other food companies for use in their products, Catsicas said. But he added that “it is not something that can be mixed into your coffee.” It also cannot be used to sweeten soft drinks, the company said.

Nestlé, which, like many big food companies, is working to reduce the fat, salt and sugar in its products, previously developed a way to reduce fat in ice cream. Its “slow-churned” ice creams are processed in such a way that they require less fat.

“It’s all about thinking: How can I expose my sensory system to the taste I’m looking for but with the minimum of that ingredient – and without replacing it with something else,” Catsicas said.

The New York Times, with Bloomberg

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China to tighten controls on overseas investments

China’s central government has ordered tighter controls on offshore investments made by state-owned enterprises amid concerns over accelerating capital outflows.
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In a statement issued on Wednesday, China’s State Council, or cabinet, said it would establish stricter supervision on the acquisition and financing of state assets overseas, including changes in shareholdings, to ensure “the safe operation of overseas assets and to increase the value of assets”.

The move comes amid an environment where Beijing has stepped up efforts to control the flow of money offshore, with a resurgence of outflows in recent weeks weakening the Chinese yuan, adding to concerns about the resilience of the world’s second-largest economy.

There are growing government concerns that overseas acquisitions are being used to disguise capital flight, with authorities also curtailing options for individuals to invest overseas. Contemporaneous crackdowns on underground banks and foreign casinos – including Australia’s Crown Resorts – have also been linked to China’s increased scrutiny on capital flows.

While China’s foreign-exchange reserves remain over $US3 trillion ($4 trillion), net outflows have reached record levels and the yuan has fallen to eight-year lows against the greenback.

While details of specific curbs were not contained in the State Council’s statement, the Wall Street Journal and Bloomberg have reported the government planned to suspend most foreign investment deals worth $US10 billion or more. It would also restrict overseas investments of at least $US1 billion for companies making acquisitions outside of their core business, as well as foreign real estate deals of more than $1 billion.

The curbs would last until the end of September 2017, Bloomberg reported, adding that regulators would pay extra attention to deals by highly leveraged firms and companies with poor return on assets.

Several government agencies have issued public statements this week to flag the greater scrutiny, including SAFE, the foreign exchange regulator, which said it would step up efforts to authenticate outbound investments and crack down on fake overseas transactions.

Chinese outbound direct investment was up 53 per cent to $145.96 billion year-on-year in October, according to China’s Commerce Ministry.

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Justin Hemmes snaps up Tennyson pub for $37.5m

Justin Hemmes’ empire now stretches from Sydney’s northern beaches to the CBD, the east and the south. Photo: Anna Kucera Ray White’s Andrew Jolliffe has sold the Tennyson Hotel to Justin Hemmes. Photo: Supplied
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Pub tsar Justin Hemmes has snapped up the Tennyson Hotel in Sydney’s Botany Road, Mascot, for $37.5 million – a record price for a hotel sale at a public auction.

It will cement the Merivale chain owner’s presence in Sydney’s suburban pub market, which is unaffected by the city-zoned lockout drinking regulations.

Mr Hemmes is expected to redevelop the site in the same way as his other properties to reflect the local demographic, which includes the nearby Green Square development.

His empire now stretches from Sydney’s northern beaches with his revamped Newport Arms, to the CBD with the Ivy and Establishment, the eastern suburbs with the Coogee Bay Pavilion and the recently re-opened Paddington Arms, and the inner-south with the Alexandria Hotel.

Ray White Hotels Asia-Pacific director Andrew Jolliffe said bidding for the Tennyson was “spirited” and the final price tag was the highest paid at auction for a freehold going concern to date.

“Justin Hemmes completely dominated the 250-person crowd,” Mr Jolliffe said.

He said the Tennyson was a popular multi-level hotel with 30 gaming machines. Notwithstanding its latest ranking at 87 in NSW, it required an upgrade and renovation plans designed by architect Paul Kelly had recently received development approval.

“Only a very small number of Top 100 gaming hotels have changed hands over the past few years, such is the vice-like grip the ever-diminishing number of consolidating ownership bodies hold on this particular asset class,” Mr Jolliffe said.

“The hotel, even in its currently unrenovated state, attracts in excess of $8 million in annual receipts from predominantly high gross profit margin revenue centres.” */]]>

The pub market is currently one of the hottest sectors in the property industry.

To take advantage of the demand, businessmen Geoff Dixon and John Singleton are selling two prized assets, the Marlborough Hotel in Newtown and Kinselas at Taylor Square, in Darlinghurst.

Mr Jolliffe, who is working on the two pub sales, said operators and traditional pub owners such as Mr Hemmes were coming back into the pub industry, which had once been dominated by investors.

He said the yields and the development upside that many of the pubs being sold were offering was the attraction.

Mr Jolliffe this week also sold Queensland’s largest hotel, The Acacia Ridge in Brisbane’s south west, to a Sydney-based fund for about $26 million.

Originally bought in 2014 for $16 million by Sydney hoteliers Peter Calligeros and partner Steve Farley, the hotel was marketed by Mr Jolliffe, together with CBRE Hotels agent Glenn Price.

Mr Jolliffe said the sale price was “directly indexed to the Acacia Ridge Hotel’s huge 18,000 square metre block, situated prominently on the very active Beaudesert Rd in the blue-collar industrial precinct of Acacia Ridge”.

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UFC superstar Conor McGregor ‘licence’ a step closer to Floyd Mayweather showdown

UFC living legend Conor McGregor has reportedly been issued a professional boxing license in the state of California.
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The move, if true, intensifies speculation that mixed martial arts king McGregor could lure undefeated square-ring champion Floyd Mayweather Jr out of retirement for an epic showdown. McGregor and Mayweather are two of the biggest names in world sport and a meeting between the two would go close to breaking all-time pay-per-view records.

Mayweather has featured in the three biggest boxing pay-per-views of all time including the record-breaking “Fight of the Century” in 2015 when he defeated fought Manny Pacquaio with 4.6 million paying TV viewers generating $400 million.

McGregor has headlined three of the four biggest UFC pay-per-view events, including the record-breaking UFC 202 when he took on Nate Diaz in a rematch of their first meeting in the welterweight division.

That event reportedly produced an unprecedented 1.65 million paid views.

The 28-year-old McGregor created UFC history last month when he became the first fighter to hold both the lightweight and featherweight titles when he defeated Eddie Alvarez at UFC 205.

Mayweather, 39, is one of the greatest boxers of all time. A five-division world champion, he remained undefeated in his 49-fight career.

On Tuesday, he posted on social media a photo of a $100 million cheque in his name, received after the Pacquaio fight.

“Y’all still have to work however, I’m happily retired,” Mayweather wrote.   Gotta love these backseat drivers so worried about another man’s legacy instead of trying to write their own. Ultimately, I will always have the last laugh. This is just one of my many checks, a cool $100,000,000.00 that I still have every dime of. Y’all still have to work however, I’m happily retired. At the end of the day, it’s them Benjamin Franklins that matter to me, so the jokes on you. I’ve made smart investments, sorry for those who thought that I couldn’t read, write, or count. Y’all call them watches, I call them time pieces. Y’all call them boats, I call them yachts. Y’all call them houses, I call them mansions. Y’all charter jets and we own jets. #TMTA photo posted by Floyd Mayweather (@floydmayweather) on Nov 28, 2016 at 11:42pm PST

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Trainer who used cattle prod on greyhound unlikely to face criminal charges

Greyhound racing at The Gardens in Newcastle, where the incident is alleged to have taken place. Photo: Marina Neil Investigation: retired Racing NSW chief steward Ray Murrihy will sift through reams of evidence into the Keinbah trial track. Photo: Barry Chapman
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A trainer who allegedly used a 6000-volt prod on a greyhound will not be charged. Photo: Brook Mitchell

A trainer who allegedly used a cattle prod capable of emitting a 6000-volt shock on a greyhound in order to make it run faster is unlikely to face criminal charges after being disqualified from the industry.

Fairfax Media understands Robert Newstead won’t be subject to police prosecution or further scrutiny from the RSPCA after being banned for 15 months by Greyhound Racing NSW for his part in an incident at Newcastle’s The Gardens track in July 2012.

Video of the incident was also obtained by the ABC and GRNSW, the state’s industry regulator, referred the case to the authorities in July to see if criminal charges could be laid. But it’s understood that such a scenario is now considered unlikely.

Newstead will instead serve a lengthy disqualification from greyhound racing after an inquiry found him guilty of “shocking” a greyhound with the electric prod as a lure travelled past the starting boxes during a trialling session.

Newstead was charged by GRNSW with two offences in October and recently pleaded guilty at a hearing.

Due to his plea he was given a 25 per cent discount on his penalty. He will be able to apply for a licence, if he wishes, in early 2018.

The footage of the cattle prod incident emerged just weeks after the NSW government announced an imminent ban of greyhound racing in the state, which was later reversed.

Deputy Premier and Racing Minister Troy Grant, who flanked Premier Mike Baird during his announcement of a ban on greyhound racing, has since quit as NSW Nationals leader after the party lost the Orange by-election to the Shooters, Fishers and Farmers party candidate Philip Donato.

Newstead hasn’t started a greyhound in any race since April this year, more than two months before footage of the cattle prod incident emerged publicly.

GRNSW has engaged former top thoroughbred racing steward Ray Murrihy to sift through reams of evidence from an investigation into the Keinbah​ trial track, which was chaired by Sydney barrister Clive Steirn​, SC.

Steirn probed whether witnesses misled a GRNSW inquiry in evidence about the conduct of participants at the trialling facility. Dozens of bones were dug up at the site in July.

Murrihy served as Racing NSW’s chief steward for more than 20 years during a distinguished career lasting more than four decades across Australia.

He will determine whether any person figuring in evidence obtained in the Keinbah trial track investigation has breached the rules of GRNSW, which found no evidence to corroborate claims of animal welfare offences at the track during its own inquiry earlier this year.

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Youth influx makes Peter Siddle nervous about playing for Australia again

Veteran pace bowler Peter Siddle has admitted that seeing so many young and inexperienced players included in the last Australian Test side made older players like him nervous about their futures.
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Siddle, 32, has been sidelined with a back injury sustained in the first Test against South Africa, early last month.

After two embarrassing defeats to the Proteas to start the three-match series, Australian selectors kickstarted a changing of the guard, making wholesale changes for the third and final Test in Adelaide.

Joe Burns, Adam Voges, Callum Ferguson, Peter Nevill and Joe Mennie all made way for debutants Matt Renshaw, Peter Handscomb and Nic Maddinson as well as Matthew Wade and Jackson Bird.

The revamped Aussie team subsequently won the day-night Test by seven wickets.

“I think so a little bit, I think it always does,” Peter Siddle told SEN when asked if the successful influx of youth made him nervous.

“But at the end of the day if you’re putting forward good performances and you’re going well, I don’t think age is going to be a factor.

“You’ve got to be performing and those young guys, when the selectors put it out there that they’re looking for a few new players, the young guys that obviously got picked performed well in the lead-up and that’s what they (selectors) want – they want players in form and I think it won’t matter if you’re 25 or early 30s, if you’re performing you’ll still get your opportunity.”

Siddle, who broke down with back stress fractures in February too, said it was frustrating to injure himself again but was optimistic about a potential Boxing Day Test return against Pakistan.

“The good thing was we got onto it early and we knew what it was so that made it easy just to keep in control rather than push it too hard and be out for a long time,” he said.

“I’ve only missed a few weeks. You never know, Boxing Day would be a nice time to come back but I’ve just got to get it right and see how I go.

“I’ll have another scan next week and see how it goes and I’m feeling good. I’m back training, fitness-wise I’m feeling good.

“You never want to miss Boxing Day as a Victorian.”

Siddle said the hardest thing about returning to full fitness was to then ascertain how hard he should push his body when ramping up his bowling so as not to suffer a recurrence.

“That’s always the hardest thing I think working out how hard to go once you come back,” he said.

“The training and everything is pretty easy because the carrot at the end is to try and play for Australia again.

“It’s just about control and how you go once you get out in the field.”

Siddle will also play his fourth season with the Melbourne Renegades in the Big Bash League this summer.

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Nick Olive hopes it will continue to be effortless for All Too Ready

Aiming high: Canberra trainer Nick Olive brings All Too Ready to Rosehill on Saturday. Photo: Jay Cronan Wizard of Odds: Live Odds, Form and Alerts for all Racing
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The syndicate that races All Too Ready is already all too familiar with the sometimes painful reality of horse ownership.

The All Too Hard filly, which runs in the opener at Rosehill on Saturday, is their second chance: an insurance job after their dream filly from the Magic Millions sale died at the breakers.

Canberra trainer Nick Olive well remembers the calls he had to make earlier this year to each syndicate member about the first filly.

“This filly was actually bought with the insurance money from another filly,” Olive said. “We paid $140,000 for a Not A Single Doubt filly at Magic Millions but she flipped over and killed herself when she was being broken in.

“It was one of those freak accidents and she just got that part of her head where there was nothing that could be done.

“I had to ring everyone and tell them what happened. It wasn’t a great day. There are a few of my good mates and first-time owners in the syndicate, so it wasn’t a good experience.

“We were able to get the insurance from her and had the chance to get them another filly and it looks like we got a good one.”

Olive headed to the Easter sales looking for a replacement and found an All Too Hard filly out of More Than Ready mare Modonna. She made an immediate impression on him and, remarkably, he secured her for the same money.

“I just liked her straight away. Everything she did was effortless. She was big and strong and an athlete,” Olive said.

“She has just continued that since she got to the stable. She is a natural.”

All Too Ready is the latest of the All Too Hards to get to the track. He leads the first-season stallion standings but is yet to have a winner from 11 runners. But the signs are good with Groundbreak and Reflectivity running seconds in Sydney two-year-old races last month.

Olive decided to come to Sydney with his filly after she won a Canberra barrier trial by 4¼ lengths without being extended and he is eyeing the Inglis Nursery with her in a couple of weeks.

“Richard Bensley​ rode her in that trial and said she was only going half pace,” Olive said. “She was a bit slow to jump but mustered quickly and as I said she is effortless in whatever she does.That’s what it looked like.

“I rang Tommy Berry and asked him to ride her a couple of weeks ago. It seems like the right option to come up there with her.

“The test is going to come on Saturday when we put her under pressure. You don’t know until then how they really go.

“But I’m confident from everything she has shown us that she will handle that.

“There are always going to be good two-year-olds around at this time of year, so we will find out a lot more about her on Saturday.”

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Fred Kersley’s long wait for group success in Perth racing carnival may be over

Fred Kersley is overseeing former rivals in the Perth carnival. Photo: Vince CaligiuriFred Kersley is one of those horsemen who have always been advocates of giving horses time to mature, and being patient when waiting for that pay day.
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It has long been regarded as the cheapest recipe for success. A former brilliant reinsman in the harness racing world, Kersley in recent years has turned his hand to racing, with considerable success.

But even the quietly spoken Kersley admitted this week that his two carnival horses Respondent and Ihtsahymn had more than worn out the patience of those involved with them.

It all started in 2014 when Respondent, then trained by Grant Williams, defeated Kersley’s Ihtsahymn in the Western Australian Derby, leaving the connections of Respondent delighted by the success and Kersley, who at the time only trained Ihtsahymn, understandably downcast at coming so close to a big race win.

“I was disappointed of course, we all like to win but that was the way it went and Respondent proved better than Ihtsahymn on the day, but it’s always in the back of your mind when you get beaten in a Derby ,” Kersley said.

But since then, both have proved costly conveyances. Itsahymn, a 2013 winner of the Kingston Town Classic, a race he will contest on Saturday, was sent to Victoria to be prepared by Paddy Payne not long after his Derby defeat.

Payne and Kersley had formed a strong partnership following the deeds of champion West Australian galloper Northerly in years gone by.

“After the Derby we felt Ihtsahymn was being weighted out of races here in Perth, so I sent him over to Paddy,” Kersley said.

“He struggled there and perhaps it was the weight that was again a concern for him and he didn’t win a race.”

Earlier this year, Ihtsahymn arrived back in Perth to be prepared for its rich summer carnival which includes the Kingston Town Classic and the Perth Cup.

At his third start back for Kersley, Ihtsahymn was successful, and not before time, as the horse had not been in the winner’s stall for 750 days.

“It was a fair time to wait, but, it looks like he’s back and the weight-for-age conditions for Saturday’s race will very much play into his hands as he won’t be giving his rivals any weight,” he said.

Just a month before Ihtsahymn arrived back on Kersley’s doorstep, a group of owners got together and purchased Respondent at a dispersal sale for $55,000.

The group chose Kersley to reinvent the horse’s career and last Saturday week Respondent won its first race in 960 days when successful at Ascot, with Kersley elated after such a long drought with a quality stayer like him.

“I’ve got to say it was nice to win but I’ve still got mixed feelings about him beating us all those days ago. But, there is very much an upside. I think Ihtsahymn will be competitive in the Kingston Town Classic, a race he’s won before, and then we can ago on to the Perth Cup,” he said.

“And when he gets to the Perth Cup he’ll be competing against Respondent and this time under the same roof. They’ll be stablemates and hopefully those years on the outer have ended and we see both of them produce their very best.”

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Message from cricketing great inspires Daniel Popovic to put himself in PGA mix

A message from good friend Ricky Ponting lit the fires and the sight of the Joe Kirkwood Cup had memories flooding back as Victorian Daniel Popovic bounced back to form on the first day of the Australian PGA Championship.
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It has been a long, long time between drinks for Popovic, who had plenty of sips from the cup back in 2012 when he broke through for his sole professional victory the final time the event was staged at Coolum before moving to Royal Pines.

There are no giant dinosaurs and spray-painted fairways on the Gold Coast this week, as was the case when he triumphed in a madcap final fling at Clive Palmer’s now-failing resort, but the 30-year-old feels as if the confidence has returned after a wretched run of injuries and form.

Ponting set the scene on Wednesday night, reminding Popovic to go back to basics as he tried to relocate the type of golf that earned him a surprise leg of the Australian triple crown in a wire-to-wire performance.

“Rick texted me last night. He knows how much I’ve been struggling mentally on the golf course. I’ll play well in rounds with him and he’s just as confused as me in tournaments,” said Popovic, who carded a two-under 70 to be five shots behind leader Andrew Dodt.

“He said to go out and hit each shot on its merit and take it one shot at a time. It sounds really simple but a lot of the time you forget about it. When you hear it from a guy like that, you should be listening.”

Popovic’s emotional PGA title helped him to a career-high ranking of 363. Now he’s the world No.1872 but starting to remember the good times of a very blurry week four years ago.

“For approximately a week, I reckon I had every single meal apart from hard food [out of the cup] – cornflakes, coffee, champagne, beer. It was our last event for the year, so I completely partied it up. I didn’t leave it out of my sight,” he said.

“When I saw the trophy on the first tee, it brought back a lot of good memories. I just wanted to run with it for the day. I’d love to be eating my cornflakes out of that again.”

A bulging disc in his back saw him spend three months in Britain earlier in the year, a week of which was spent staying with cricket star Kevin Pietersen, who like Ponting, is a huge golf fan and enthusiastic player.

And the year before that, he spent months recovering from the ankle he broke during a regrettable golf buggy incident in the carpark of The Heritage course just north of Melbourne.

“Last year I broke my ankle, coming back from that was really hard. I flipped a golf cart. It was the stupidest thing I’ve ever done.

“I was completely sober. It was 11am and pouring down outside. Just like kids do when they’re bored, I tried to do too much and made some big mistakes. I turned it far too hard on a side hill, I flipped over, Ryan Lynch fell on top of me and so did the golf cart.

“This year, I had a bulging disc in my back and that was really difficult. But the belief is still there, my game is still there, I know I can win tournaments, that I can compete.”

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Jason Attard draws on Sons Of John experience as he steps up Reiby The Red

Jason Attard with his star miler Sons Of John. Photo: Brendan EspositoWizard of Odds: Live Odds, Form and Alerts for all Racing
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Hawkesbury trainer Jason Attard isn’t that worried about the huge step up in class Reiby The Red takes in Saturday’s ATC Cup at Rosehill.

The son of Dane Shadow sits a whopping 32 points  behind topweight Mighty Lucky on the benchmark. Mighty Lucky will carry 60kg compared to the limit weight of 54kg for Reiby The Red on Saturday.

In reality Reiby The Red should have 46kg for his first open class experience, but Attard takes confidence from his experiences with Sons Of John into the listed race, which could serve as a lead-up to the Villiiers Stakes for the five-year-old.

“If he can run well I would like to drop him back to the mile in the Villiers, I think he is good enough to be at this level and he gets his chance without the weight he has been carrying,” Attard said. “I learned with Sons Of John they can take big steps if they are good enough, especially down in the weights.”

When Attard did the same with Sons Of John, he ran into a handy type named Winx in the Theo Marks Quality, the beginning of her winning run. Reiby The Red won’t have that star power against him, just a bunch of good, hardened stayers.

The plan all along for Attard has been to target the summer carnival with Reiby The Red, which had had a campaign of near misses until he won easily over a mile at Warwick Farm on November 16.

The three runs before that had all finished in photo finish defeats for a galloper which likes to dictate terms from the front. Resuming he found Meiner Freccia too strong, then New Tipperary got him on the line as it began to emerge as a quality stayer. Then Reiby The Red was a close third to Circular at Hawkesbury on Oaks day; the Godolphin mare would  win the Goulburn Cup at her next start.

“The form has just stood up around him. He has been getting beaten by short margins and the horses have been going out and winning again,” Attard said. “You start to think his turn isn’t going to come.

“He was very strong under 60 kilos last time and I think getting down to 54 is going to help him.”

Reiby The Red’s pattern of racing on speed means he will control his own fate and Attard was delighted to draw gate one.

“It means he can just be there without doing too much work and over 2000m he should be able to relax  and get the chance to run his race,” Attard said.

“There are a couple of others that will push forward, so it will be a good test for him, but it is a risk worth taking with a horse like him.”

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