Fire danger starts today

The 2016-17 Fire Danger Season officially begins today, with state-wide fire restrictions now in place.
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Fire restrictions for the Adelaide Metropolitan, Mount Lofty Ranges and Kangaroo Island areas take effect from today, the last areas in the State to fall within the restrictions.

SA CFS is urging residents within these districts to prepare, with research showing that only 56 per cent of at-risk people aware that they live in bushfire prone area.

Alarmingly, the research also shows that only 32 per cent of people living in bushfire areas have a Bushfire Survival Plan.

Of particular concern are those living in urban fringe areas, many not comprehending their level of bushfire risk.

The highest risk demographic is the 18-39 year old group, who have not lived through the worst bushfire in the Adelaide Hills – Ash Wednesday. Statistics show that this group are the least prepared for bushfires and do not truly realise the consequences,

The CFS is urging the community to Plan to Survive and visit the CFS website 梧桐夜网cfs.sa.org419论坛 to prepare their Bushfire Survival Plan.

Background

The research comes from an independent study conducted by McGregor Tan

More than 900 significant bushfires have burnt along the Adelaide city edge or interface since 1931, showing the importance of people in those areas having a Bushfire Survival Plan.

Fire permits are required for all burning activities during the fire danger season or on days where a total fire ban is declared.

On Total Fire Ban Days extra restrictions apply such as the use solid fuel barbecues, or harvest – more restrictions are listed on the CFS website 梧桐夜网cfs.sa.gov419论坛.

Penalties including fines and imprisonment may apply where a person is found guilty of lighting a fire without a permit during the fire danger season.

Emergency Services Minister Peter Malinauskas said: “The start of the fire danger season means all South Australians need to take responsibility to ensure fires don’t begin unnecessarily.

“Research showing the low levels of awareness and preparedness for bushfires is incredibly alarming, and I urge South Australians to educate themselves about bushfires and to get their plan in place.

“We are especially reminding those who live on the outskirts of metropolitan Adelaide they are not immune to the tragedy of bushfire.

“It is everyone’s responsibility to stay informed this fire season via the AlertSA App, CFS website and by listening to your local emergency broadcaster, so that when fire does strike, plans can be enacted.”

SA CFS acting chief officerAndrew Stark: “Every year we see the devastation fires can cause to communities, so we ask everyone to be prepared for bushfire – they will happen.

“It’s not good enough to know you need a Bushfire Survival Plan – you must take the time to write and practice that plan, to think about alternatives if you plan will not work.

“If you live in a town or city you need a plan in case you choose to travel or holiday in a bushfire prone area.”

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Mudgee’sCup Day

2015 winner Fox Solid.
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The race day that stops the town is here – the 2016 Mudgee Cup showcase meeting will be run and won today at theMudgee Race Club.

Gates open at 11am with theeight-race Mudgee Cup program gettingunderway at 1.20pm with the Whitsundays Showcase Maiden Plate (1500m).

The day’s main event will be the$50,000 Robert Oatley Vineyards Mudgee Cup (1600m), Race 7 at 5.05pm.

Local trainers Cameron Crockett and Gayna Williams will have runners Are You Sure and Strong Boy, respectively, competing for the big prize.

There will also be plenty of cheering forSomething Borrowed, who is trained at Dubbo by former jockey Justin Stanley but his group of 10 owners are all from Mudgee.

Among those they’ll have to overcome will be 2015 Mudgee Cup winner Fox Solid, trained by Wellington’sGarry McCarney, back for another tilt.

The meeting will also seethe $35,000 Montrose Mudgee Cup Day Sprint (1200m), featuring local trainers Brett Thompson (Iwilldoit), Mack Griffith (Pera Pera), and Max Crockett (Lancelot).

Cameron Crockett said, “It’s the best country cup on the calendar”.

“If you exclude places like Wagga and Scone,which I don’t really call country cups becausethey’re more like city meetings,for a true-blue country cup this is hands down the best meeting around.

“I’ve been to every cup around here and you can’t compare them to Mudgee.”

He said another highlight will be Race 4, the Country Showcase Maiden Handicap (1200m), which he believes is a great concept for regional trainers.

“The beauty of the showcase days is they have a country maiden on every program, which is great because they’re worth about $23,000 to the winner and they have to be won by a country horse,” he said.

“Outside of the cup they’re generally the highest prize money of the day. It’s a great incentive.”

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Last chance for final

ONE STEP AT A TIME: Wagga City captain Warren Clunes isn’t focusing on the one-day situation as his team prepares to tackle Kooringal Colts.
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Wagga City can force itself into the one-day final if results fall its way on Saturday.

The Cats are currently fourth but can jump up to second, and secure a place in February’s final this weekend during the last round of one-dayers.

First they need to defeat third-placedKooringal Colts at McPherson Oval.

The Cats also need undefeated ladder leaders Lake Albert to winthe top-of-the-table clash with South Wagga at Robertson Oval.

Both the Cats and the Colts are four points behind South Wagga, but Wagga City’s quotient could give them the edge.

They have a quotient of 1.59, slightly behind South Wagga’s 1.62, but significantly ahead of the 0.83 of the Colts.

However, Cats captain Warren Clunes isn’t looking too far ahead.

“We aren’t really thinking about the final, but if it comes it comes,” Clunes said.

“You always want to win flags but we had a pretty disappointing start to the year andwe will worry about getting the win on the board first.”

Wagga City’s chances haven’t been helped with a number of its younger brigade unavailable due to junior representative cricket.

Harry Rosengren, Max Harper,Nick Cawley and RitchieTurner have all come out of the team.

In their place comes Cane Graetz, Chris Butt, Jacob Craig and Jay Butler.

Kooringal Colts have also had to make a couple of changes to its line-up after a narrow loss to Lake Albert last week.

Sam Whitfield returns to the team while Will Morley and Jeremy Bunn are out butthey are yet to lock in a replacement wicketkeeper.

With plenty of the line for both clubs, Colts captain-coach David Bolton is expecting atough test.

Lake Albert got home with two wickets and two balls to spare last week and Bolton is looking for a better performance with the bat.

“We got off to another good start but lost our way a bit in the middle overs again,” Boltonsaid.

“That was two weeks in a row that we haven’t batted out our 40 overs so that is the goal this week.

“Hopefully we can get off to another good start, consolidate through the middle and have wickets in hand for the last five or 10 overs so we can push a bit bigger score.

“We bowled and fielded really well but had no margin for error.”

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Rainwater tank solution for residents

NEIGHBOURS of the RAAF Base at Tindal are likely to receive free rainwater tanks because of chemical contamination fears.
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The Defence Department last week confirmed it “was considering supplying eligible households with rainwater tanks” although Katherine Times has been told by several residents the offer had already been made.

“They see it as a cheaper option than bringing bottled water to us every week,” one resident, who did not want to be named, said.

“This way it is one expense and it’s over …they’ve offered to fill it with clean water too.”

It is now believed between 20 and 30 families neighbouring the base are receiving “alternative sources of drinking water” after chemicals called PFAS were found in ground and surface water testing.

Traces of PFAS have also been found in Katherine’s drinking water although at levels well below allowable limits.

With a further year of testing to come, initial tests found PFAS used in firefighting foams at the base between 1988 and 2004 have leached from the base into the groundwater.

“Defence has adopted a precautionary approach and is providing alternative sources of drinking water to eligible residents located in close proximity to the base who do not have a town water connection, and rely on the use of a bore for drinking water,” a spokesman said.

“Defence will also provide water to residents if drinking water is sourced from a rainwater tank that contains, or has contained, bore water in the past.”

Many questions were asked at the defence department sponmsored water forums in Katherine late last month on the use of rainwater tanks.

Many residents said bore water was regularly used to top up supplies during the long dry season and defence officials agreed it may mean the tanks themselves are now contaminated.

“Defence may also provide drinking water to residents in other exceptional circumstances,” the spokesman said.

“Each household’s drinking water requirements will be assessed on a case-by-case basis,” the spokesman said.

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Victoria’s must-win games

It’s make or break for Victoria in its Ballarat-Geelong premier bowls clash with Webbcona this week.
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Victoria has lost its last threematches to Sebastopol, Ocean Grove and City of Geelong andnow finds itself 23 points outside the top four.

The reigning premiers quest to return to the winners list gets noeasier as it takes on an inform Webbcona outfit. But premier bowler Stephen Britt said this Saturday and the following week’s hit-out with City Oval were must-win matches if it is to keep its finals hopes alive.

“The next two games are pretty vital for us, we’ve got Webbcona and City Oval and if we don’t win both of them I’d say we’re out of the running,” Britt said.

“We’re right in it, but we just need to win a few games.

“It’s going to be tough, we’re already probably a game and-a-half outside the four now, so we can’t afford to losethis week or next week.”

MUST-WIN CLASH: Victoria’s Lindsay Annear will be looking to play his role in the side’s return to form as it takes on Webbcona. Picture: Lachlan Bence

Britt said it was proving difficult to cover the departures of some of its premiership side, with only 11 regular members playing on this season.

Victoria hasbeen “plugging holes” for much of the season, but believeif itcan win the next two games then itwill be right in the mix once again at the completion of the first roundof the fixture.

While Britt acknowledges you can’t replace premiership players, their absence is allowing others to fill the void and improve as bowlers –giving the side hope that its best bowls is in front of it.

“Our form is reasonable, we haven’t been thrashed by anyone, but we’re just struggling to field a full side every week with blokes unavailable and not playing this year, due to family commitments.

“Winning a grand finalis one thing, keeping the team together is another.

“We’re missing some of our better players and you can’t replace them, our depth doesn’t go to replacing our best players.

“We’re givingpeople opportunitiesto play at the highest level and it will improve them. We’ve just got to hang in there and try and do the best we can for the rest of the year.

“We’re a couple short this week again, we’re a bit light on, but we’re playing at home and it’s our chance to bounce back.

“Webbcona are playing really well, they’re right up there in the four and they’ll be hard to beat because they’ll want tostay there. We’re going to be trying our hardest to knock them off.”

LADDERLara 73, 137Ocean Grove 73, 117.6Webbcona 70, 118.7Sebastopol 70, 107.5Queenscliff 67, 109.5Bareena 49, 94.2Victoria 47, 101.4City Oval 44, 83.2City of Geelong 35, 80.2Buninyong 12, 70.1This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

A dead heat in dead calf court battle

Shire-wide news extracts from the Moruya Examiner ofDecember 2, 1916, provided by the Moruya & District Historical Society:
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Copies of local newspapers from the 1860s to date can be viewed at the Society’s Family History Research Centre (Ph 4474 3224) situated at the rear of the museum.

LOCAL LITIGANTS. – At the local court on Monday last, two cases were listed for hearing before Mr. Shepherd P. M., Mr. P. Egan J. P. also occupying a seat on the Bench. C. Fitzgerald sued Mr. Millard for loss of a calf, alleged to have been killed by the latter’s dog, and M. Millard claimed damages from C. Fitzgerald for assault. Plaintiffs were successful in both cases.

NO FIGHT. – The lads dragged away from their farms and dairies against their will, to fight overseas, under the Hughes’ War Proclamation Act, have been discharged without striking a blow, the Proclamation having been withdrawn.

ROLL OF HONOUR. – On Tuesday last Mr. Joe Grumley, who had just returned to Moruya after seeing his second son, T. J. Grumley, sail for the front on Saturday, received a cable containing the bad news that his eldest son, W. L. Grumley, who had enlisted over 12 months ago, had been wounded in France. Let us hope that the wounds received by this brave soldier, who had passed unscathed through several stiff battles, are not of a serious nature, and that he will soon be convalescent again.

DEATH. – There died at the residence of his son-in-law, Mr. J. Buckley on Sunday, one of Moruya’s oldest pioneers, in the person of Mr. John Gardiner, at the advanced age of 87 years. Mr. Gardiner, who was born in Somerset, England, came direct to this district about 58 years ago and took up farming at the Burra, where he reared a large and highly respected family. He was of an unassuming character, many unostentatious kindnesses as a neighbour being recorded of him. His wife predeceased him 17 years ago. During his 12 months illness he was tenderly nursed by his eldest daughter, Mrs. J. Buckley. He leaves two sons – John (Lismore), and Alfred (Moruya); six daughters – Mrs. J. Buckley (Mullenderree), G. Rose, Byrnes, Brown, Gardiner (Sydney) and Jones (Little River.)

NERRIGUNDAH. – List of cases heard before G. S. Shepherd Esq, Police Magistrate, at Nerrigundah Police Court on 29th November 1916. Claude T. Smith, fined 10/- and 6/- costs, for failing to register a dog.

Application by Clarence D. Fraser, for dredging lease.

Two public meetings have been called for the last two Saturdays for the Roll of Honour, but both have been unsuccessful.

Excellent specimens of gold have been found, and within a very short time good finds are expected.

Prospectors are getting prepared to go out to Berlimba.

All gardens are looking well after the rains.

A cattle sale held at “Thistlewood” the property of William Lavis and Son, last Saturday the 25th was very successful, cattle bringing big prices.

NELLIGEN. – Up to the present we have had cool, pleasant weather, with occasional heavy showers, and an entire absence of hot weather. Grass is plentiful and stock are beginning to look well. Present indications point to a good summer. The “Oldest Inhabitant” and local weather prophet have now put their reverse gears into action, and now predict good rains until Xmas, followed by a dry January. Their forecast of a dry season made at the beginning of Spring was followed by a fall of 30 inches and 20 points of rain, and most of us have lost faith in them, and their predictions are now met with jeers and unseemly laughter.

BENEFIT. – Some time ago it was decided to organise a benefit to assist the family of Mr. G. Wright, who had the misfortune to lose his leg by amputation, following on an accident. As the unfortunate man had previously lost an arm, his case met with ready sympathy, and as a result of a ball and subscription lists, a cheque for over £30 was forwarded to Mrs Wright. For a small district the response is highly creditable, and the people are to be complimented on their generosity.

Copies of local newspapers from the 1860s to date can be viewed at the Society’s Family History Research Centre (Ph 4474 3224) situated at the rear of the Museum in Campbell St. Moruya (梧桐夜网mdhs.org419论坛).

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Salt & Light: Bawley Point’s iPhone photographer publishes first bookphotosvideo

Salt & Light: Bawley Point’s iPhone photographer publishes first book | photos | video READY: Ryan Pernofski in action. Photo: Mikey McArthur.
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Photo: Ryan Pernofski.

Photo: Thurston Photo.

Photo: Ryan Pernofski.

Photo: Ryan Pernofski.

Photo: Thurston Photo.

Photo: Ryan Pernofski.

Photo: Ryan Pernofski.

Photo: Ryan Pernofski.

Photo: Ryan Pernofski.

TweetFacebookSalt & Lighthas been released by Harbour Publishing House.

“Basically I had all my photos sitting there, posting them on Instagram and I was designing other peoples books and knew I could do it with mine,” he said.

“It took about a bit more than a year to put together.

“It’s not something you can force.

“It was a lot of hard work, but I’m stoked.”

Salt & Light is filled with photos, stories, musings and photography tips from Ryan’s travels along the South Coast.

The majority of the images are shot between Kiama and Bawley Point, with a few from Queensland which Ryan says will be easy to spot “because they are the ones without any surf”; and99-per-cent are shot on his iPhone. Which is no mean feat for anyone who has used one.

ACTION: Ryan Pernofski, his iPhone and waterproof case capturing ocean magic. Photo: Thurston Photo.

Ryan is humble and said iPhone imagehas a lot to do with the lighting.

“I just swim out there and try to get some good angles, but it’s all about the lighting,” he said.

“I’ll eithergo in the early morning or just before sunset. The light is really dynamic then.

“The size of the lens on theiPhone is sosmall thatyou need to constantly get the water off or it ruins the photo.

“I lick it. It puts a little film on it. It makes the water kind of run off.”

However, Ryanwhile trying to get the perfect shot out of the ocean Ryan does not recommend licking your camera lens.

“That’s just wired, it would be gross… Wipe it on your shirt,” he joked.

Salt & Light: Photo Journal by Ryan Pernofskiis available via Harbour Publishing House RRP $24.99.

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School musos band together

BIG BAND: Students from six schools united for a special music festival at Brauer College on Thursday. Picture: Vicky Hughson
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INSTRUMENTALISTS from six south-west schools joined forces for a special concert on Thursday.

Believed to be the first event of its kind in over a decade, the South West Youth Music Festival gave about 70 musicians from Brauer, Warrnambool, Camperdown, Terang, Mortlake P-12 and King’s collegesplus some home-school students the chance to rehearse together before giving afree public performance at Brauer’s Anderson Theatre.

School musos band together The inaugural South West Youth Music Festival at Brauer College. Pictured is Tim Fagan, 14, from Camperdown College. Picture: Vicky Hughson

The inaugural South West Youth Music Festival at Brauer College. Pictured is Harry Malikoff, 12, from King’s College. Picture: Vicky Hughson

The inaugural South West Youth Music Festival at Brauer College. Pictured is Alyse Schintler, 15, from Brauer College. Picture: Vicky Hughson

The inaugural South West Youth Music Festival at Brauer College. Pictured is Anna Barker, 12, from King’s College. Picture: Vicky Hughson

The inaugural South West Youth Music Festival at Brauer College. Pictured is Esther Lim, 14, who is home-schooled. Picture: Vicky Hughson

The inaugural South West Youth Music Festival at Brauer College. Pictured is Molly Jackway, 13, from Warrnambool College. Picture: Vicky Hughson

The inaugural South West Youth Music Festival at Brauer College. Pictured is Matthew Lim, 17, who is home-schooled. Picture: Vicky Hughson

The inaugural South West Youth Music Festival brought together students from six different schools. Pictured (front) is Olivia Burn, 15, from Warrnambool College. Picture: Vicky Hughson

The inaugural South West Youth Music Festival at Brauer College. Pictured is Kelan Galbraith, 18, from Warrnambool College. Picture: Vicky Hughson

The inaugural South West Youth Music Festival at Brauer College. Pictured is Brigitte Fowler, 12, from Terang College. Picture: Vicky Hughson

The inaugural South West Youth Music Festival at Brauer College. Pictured is Charlie Brown, 13, from Warrnambool College. Picture: Vicky Hughson

The inaugural South West Youth Music Festival at Brauer College. Pictured is teacher Kristen Cram. Picture: Vicky Hughson

The inaugural South West Youth Music Festival at Brauer College. Pictured is James Collinson from King’s College. Picture: Vicky Hughson

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Stage is set for Circular Head show

Cooking: Archer Morice, Kip Waymouth, Laicey Haywood-Barker, Elsa Gunningham and Archie Best from Stanley Primary School cooking cupcakes for the show. There will be something for everyone atthe 108th Circular Head Agricultural Show at the Stanley Recreation Ground this Saturday.
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The Circular Head Show is the final agricultural show of the year for Tasmania and organisers are anticipating another big event.

Circular Head Agricultural Society secretary and treasurer Sue Smedley said there would be a lot going on throughout the day and something to suit people of all ages.

“It doesn’t matter what age you are, you could spend all day really just wandering from one thing to another,” Mrs Smedley said.

Mrs Smedley said traditional events and attractions including the animal nursery, horse jumping, woodchopping, cattle competitions, showgirl competition and the grand parade would be among the highlights.

She said the addition of two first-time events to the program would also be of interest.

“We’ve got two firsts this year, oneis the dog agility performance demonstrations, which I think will be very good, because it’s very spectator friendly,” Mrs Smedley said.

“The Canine Performance Association ladies that are running it are going to be interacting with spectators and anyone can ask questions.

“I think that’ll be a really big plus for the show and we’ve also got Ritchie Wells and his bullocks in conjunction with Warren (Purton)and his drafting horses doing a ploughing demonstration.

“Ritchie working with his bullocks, he’s very professional and he’s just great to watch and everyone loves draft horses.”

The first events of the day will be the cattle judging, beginning with the beef breed and dairy general classes from 8.30am.The dog agility events, ploughing demonstration and circus workshop will be held in the morning, before pupils from Stanley Primary School singing the national anthem at 11.50am.

From 12pm, there will be an address from show society president, Tony Hine, as well as mayor Daryl Quilliam and VDL Farms manager David Beca, who will officially open the show.

The opening will be followed by the announcement of the winners of the showgirl competition.

The culmination of the show is the grand parade, which will begin at 3pm and will be led by Ritchie’s Working Bullocks.

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‘Broken dreams’: Appin mine contractors hit the street over wage cuts

‘Broken dreams’: Appin mine contractors hit the street over wage cuts Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet
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Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

The CFMEU’s Bob Timbs (left) joins Illawarra Labor MPs Ryan Park (Keira), Anna Watson (Shellharbour) and Paul Scully (Wollongong). Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

Wollongong MP Paul Scully (Labor) addresses the gathering. Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

South Coast Labour Council secretary Arthur Rorris addresses the crowd. Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

TweetFacebookMercury hascontacted Mastermyne and South32 for comment.

‘They breathe the same air, do the same work’Former miner Paul Rossandich, who worked at the West Cliff Colliery for 34 years, has “seen all this before”.

“No one should work underground for a contractor on one wage and a permanent person on another wage – they breathe the same air and they do the same work,”MrRossandich, from Bombo, said.

The 68-year-old, who retired about eight years ago,was one of more than 300 people who rallied over wage inequality between permanent and contract workersin Appin on Thursday.

MrRossandich was “fortunate enough to be a permanent employee” during his time underground and said the conditions and wages forcurrent contractors were“just unacceptable”.

Retired miner Paul Rossandich, from Bombo, at Thursday’s rally in Appin. Picture: Robert Peet

“I wouldn’t work down there,” he said.

“I know technology’s improved and everything but still it’s a hazardous and dangerous environment.”

Having worked in many facets of mining,from pillarextraction to longwall,Mr Rossandich has“seen the good, the bad and the ugly”.

“Now I’m seeing the ugly, the ugly, the ugly,” he said.

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