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A dead heat in dead calf court battle

Shire-wide news extracts from the Moruya Examiner ofDecember 2, 1916, provided by the Moruya & District Historical Society:
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Copies of local newspapers from the 1860s to date can be viewed at the Society’s Family History Research Centre (Ph 4474 3224) situated at the rear of the museum.

LOCAL LITIGANTS. – At the local court on Monday last, two cases were listed for hearing before Mr. Shepherd P. M., Mr. P. Egan J. P. also occupying a seat on the Bench. C. Fitzgerald sued Mr. Millard for loss of a calf, alleged to have been killed by the latter’s dog, and M. Millard claimed damages from C. Fitzgerald for assault. Plaintiffs were successful in both cases.

NO FIGHT. – The lads dragged away from their farms and dairies against their will, to fight overseas, under the Hughes’ War Proclamation Act, have been discharged without striking a blow, the Proclamation having been withdrawn.

ROLL OF HONOUR. – On Tuesday last Mr. Joe Grumley, who had just returned to Moruya after seeing his second son, T. J. Grumley, sail for the front on Saturday, received a cable containing the bad news that his eldest son, W. L. Grumley, who had enlisted over 12 months ago, had been wounded in France. Let us hope that the wounds received by this brave soldier, who had passed unscathed through several stiff battles, are not of a serious nature, and that he will soon be convalescent again.

DEATH. – There died at the residence of his son-in-law, Mr. J. Buckley on Sunday, one of Moruya’s oldest pioneers, in the person of Mr. John Gardiner, at the advanced age of 87 years. Mr. Gardiner, who was born in Somerset, England, came direct to this district about 58 years ago and took up farming at the Burra, where he reared a large and highly respected family. He was of an unassuming character, many unostentatious kindnesses as a neighbour being recorded of him. His wife predeceased him 17 years ago. During his 12 months illness he was tenderly nursed by his eldest daughter, Mrs. J. Buckley. He leaves two sons – John (Lismore), and Alfred (Moruya); six daughters – Mrs. J. Buckley (Mullenderree), G. Rose, Byrnes, Brown, Gardiner (Sydney) and Jones (Little River.)

NERRIGUNDAH. – List of cases heard before G. S. Shepherd Esq, Police Magistrate, at Nerrigundah Police Court on 29th November 1916. Claude T. Smith, fined 10/- and 6/- costs, for failing to register a dog.

Application by Clarence D. Fraser, for dredging lease.

Two public meetings have been called for the last two Saturdays for the Roll of Honour, but both have been unsuccessful.

Excellent specimens of gold have been found, and within a very short time good finds are expected.

Prospectors are getting prepared to go out to Berlimba.

All gardens are looking well after the rains.

A cattle sale held at “Thistlewood” the property of William Lavis and Son, last Saturday the 25th was very successful, cattle bringing big prices.

NELLIGEN. – Up to the present we have had cool, pleasant weather, with occasional heavy showers, and an entire absence of hot weather. Grass is plentiful and stock are beginning to look well. Present indications point to a good summer. The “Oldest Inhabitant” and local weather prophet have now put their reverse gears into action, and now predict good rains until Xmas, followed by a dry January. Their forecast of a dry season made at the beginning of Spring was followed by a fall of 30 inches and 20 points of rain, and most of us have lost faith in them, and their predictions are now met with jeers and unseemly laughter.

BENEFIT. – Some time ago it was decided to organise a benefit to assist the family of Mr. G. Wright, who had the misfortune to lose his leg by amputation, following on an accident. As the unfortunate man had previously lost an arm, his case met with ready sympathy, and as a result of a ball and subscription lists, a cheque for over £30 was forwarded to Mrs Wright. For a small district the response is highly creditable, and the people are to be complimented on their generosity.

Copies of local newspapers from the 1860s to date can be viewed at the Society’s Family History Research Centre (Ph 4474 3224) situated at the rear of the Museum in Campbell St. Moruya (苏州美甲培训mdhs.org419论坛).

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Salt & Light: Bawley Point’s iPhone photographer publishes first bookphotosvideo

Salt & Light: Bawley Point’s iPhone photographer publishes first book | photos | video READY: Ryan Pernofski in action. Photo: Mikey McArthur.
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Photo: Ryan Pernofski.

Photo: Thurston Photo.

Photo: Ryan Pernofski.

Photo: Ryan Pernofski.

Photo: Thurston Photo.

Photo: Ryan Pernofski.

Photo: Ryan Pernofski.

Photo: Ryan Pernofski.

Photo: Ryan Pernofski.

TweetFacebookSalt & Lighthas been released by Harbour Publishing House.

“Basically I had all my photos sitting there, posting them on Instagram and I was designing other peoples books and knew I could do it with mine,” he said.

“It took about a bit more than a year to put together.

“It’s not something you can force.

“It was a lot of hard work, but I’m stoked.”

Salt & Light is filled with photos, stories, musings and photography tips from Ryan’s travels along the South Coast.

The majority of the images are shot between Kiama and Bawley Point, with a few from Queensland which Ryan says will be easy to spot “because they are the ones without any surf”; and99-per-cent are shot on his iPhone. Which is no mean feat for anyone who has used one.

ACTION: Ryan Pernofski, his iPhone and waterproof case capturing ocean magic. Photo: Thurston Photo.

Ryan is humble and said iPhone imagehas a lot to do with the lighting.

“I just swim out there and try to get some good angles, but it’s all about the lighting,” he said.

“I’ll eithergo in the early morning or just before sunset. The light is really dynamic then.

“The size of the lens on theiPhone is sosmall thatyou need to constantly get the water off or it ruins the photo.

“I lick it. It puts a little film on it. It makes the water kind of run off.”

However, Ryanwhile trying to get the perfect shot out of the ocean Ryan does not recommend licking your camera lens.

“That’s just wired, it would be gross… Wipe it on your shirt,” he joked.

Salt & Light: Photo Journal by Ryan Pernofskiis available via Harbour Publishing House RRP $24.99.

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School musos band together

BIG BAND: Students from six schools united for a special music festival at Brauer College on Thursday. Picture: Vicky Hughson
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INSTRUMENTALISTS from six south-west schools joined forces for a special concert on Thursday.

Believed to be the first event of its kind in over a decade, the South West Youth Music Festival gave about 70 musicians from Brauer, Warrnambool, Camperdown, Terang, Mortlake P-12 and King’s collegesplus some home-school students the chance to rehearse together before giving afree public performance at Brauer’s Anderson Theatre.

School musos band together The inaugural South West Youth Music Festival at Brauer College. Pictured is Tim Fagan, 14, from Camperdown College. Picture: Vicky Hughson

The inaugural South West Youth Music Festival at Brauer College. Pictured is Harry Malikoff, 12, from King’s College. Picture: Vicky Hughson

The inaugural South West Youth Music Festival at Brauer College. Pictured is Alyse Schintler, 15, from Brauer College. Picture: Vicky Hughson

The inaugural South West Youth Music Festival at Brauer College. Pictured is Anna Barker, 12, from King’s College. Picture: Vicky Hughson

The inaugural South West Youth Music Festival at Brauer College. Pictured is Esther Lim, 14, who is home-schooled. Picture: Vicky Hughson

The inaugural South West Youth Music Festival at Brauer College. Pictured is Molly Jackway, 13, from Warrnambool College. Picture: Vicky Hughson

The inaugural South West Youth Music Festival at Brauer College. Pictured is Matthew Lim, 17, who is home-schooled. Picture: Vicky Hughson

The inaugural South West Youth Music Festival brought together students from six different schools. Pictured (front) is Olivia Burn, 15, from Warrnambool College. Picture: Vicky Hughson

The inaugural South West Youth Music Festival at Brauer College. Pictured is Kelan Galbraith, 18, from Warrnambool College. Picture: Vicky Hughson

The inaugural South West Youth Music Festival at Brauer College. Pictured is Brigitte Fowler, 12, from Terang College. Picture: Vicky Hughson

The inaugural South West Youth Music Festival at Brauer College. Pictured is Charlie Brown, 13, from Warrnambool College. Picture: Vicky Hughson

The inaugural South West Youth Music Festival at Brauer College. Pictured is teacher Kristen Cram. Picture: Vicky Hughson

The inaugural South West Youth Music Festival at Brauer College. Pictured is James Collinson from King’s College. Picture: Vicky Hughson

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Stage is set for Circular Head show

Cooking: Archer Morice, Kip Waymouth, Laicey Haywood-Barker, Elsa Gunningham and Archie Best from Stanley Primary School cooking cupcakes for the show. There will be something for everyone atthe 108th Circular Head Agricultural Show at the Stanley Recreation Ground this Saturday.
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The Circular Head Show is the final agricultural show of the year for Tasmania and organisers are anticipating another big event.

Circular Head Agricultural Society secretary and treasurer Sue Smedley said there would be a lot going on throughout the day and something to suit people of all ages.

“It doesn’t matter what age you are, you could spend all day really just wandering from one thing to another,” Mrs Smedley said.

Mrs Smedley said traditional events and attractions including the animal nursery, horse jumping, woodchopping, cattle competitions, showgirl competition and the grand parade would be among the highlights.

She said the addition of two first-time events to the program would also be of interest.

“We’ve got two firsts this year, oneis the dog agility performance demonstrations, which I think will be very good, because it’s very spectator friendly,” Mrs Smedley said.

“The Canine Performance Association ladies that are running it are going to be interacting with spectators and anyone can ask questions.

“I think that’ll be a really big plus for the show and we’ve also got Ritchie Wells and his bullocks in conjunction with Warren (Purton)and his drafting horses doing a ploughing demonstration.

“Ritchie working with his bullocks, he’s very professional and he’s just great to watch and everyone loves draft horses.”

The first events of the day will be the cattle judging, beginning with the beef breed and dairy general classes from 8.30am.The dog agility events, ploughing demonstration and circus workshop will be held in the morning, before pupils from Stanley Primary School singing the national anthem at 11.50am.

From 12pm, there will be an address from show society president, Tony Hine, as well as mayor Daryl Quilliam and VDL Farms manager David Beca, who will officially open the show.

The opening will be followed by the announcement of the winners of the showgirl competition.

The culmination of the show is the grand parade, which will begin at 3pm and will be led by Ritchie’s Working Bullocks.

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‘Broken dreams’: Appin mine contractors hit the street over wage cuts

‘Broken dreams’: Appin mine contractors hit the street over wage cuts Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet
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Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

The CFMEU’s Bob Timbs (left) joins Illawarra Labor MPs Ryan Park (Keira), Anna Watson (Shellharbour) and Paul Scully (Wollongong). Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

Wollongong MP Paul Scully (Labor) addresses the gathering. Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

South Coast Labour Council secretary Arthur Rorris addresses the crowd. Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

Appin Colliery contractors, their families, supporters and state politicians took part in a union-led protest at Appin Park on Thursday morning, rallying against the ongoing wage gap between permanent and contract mine workers. Picture: Robert Peet

TweetFacebookMercury hascontacted Mastermyne and South32 for comment.

‘They breathe the same air, do the same work’Former miner Paul Rossandich, who worked at the West Cliff Colliery for 34 years, has “seen all this before”.

“No one should work underground for a contractor on one wage and a permanent person on another wage – they breathe the same air and they do the same work,”MrRossandich, from Bombo, said.

The 68-year-old, who retired about eight years ago,was one of more than 300 people who rallied over wage inequality between permanent and contract workersin Appin on Thursday.

MrRossandich was “fortunate enough to be a permanent employee” during his time underground and said the conditions and wages forcurrent contractors were“just unacceptable”.

Retired miner Paul Rossandich, from Bombo, at Thursday’s rally in Appin. Picture: Robert Peet

“I wouldn’t work down there,” he said.

“I know technology’s improved and everything but still it’s a hazardous and dangerous environment.”

Having worked in many facets of mining,from pillarextraction to longwall,Mr Rossandich has“seen the good, the bad and the ugly”.

“Now I’m seeing the ugly, the ugly, the ugly,” he said.

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Wollondilly on gaol shortlist

The state government hasconfirmed that amega gaol housing 5000prisoners is on the cards for Wollondilly Shire.
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The mayor, councillors and council staff were briefed about the proposal on Monday.

Officers from the NSW Department of Justice told those at the meeting the shire was one of three potential locations for the prison.

They refused to provide any detail about what potential sites within Wollondilly were under consideration.

They also declined to specify which other two locations were shortlisted for the gaol.

The department officers told the council the decision on the preferred location was likely to be made as early as 2017.

Mayor Judith Hannan was concerneda gaol would cause angstfor residents.

“A gaol facility of this scale will change the character of our shire and is not consistent with our vision for the future,” she said.

“We expect that the proposal will be met with very strong community opposition.”

Cr Hannan is calling on residents to tell her their opinion bysending her an email.

“I am quite concerned that the community needs to be heard and the councilneeds to be on the same page,” she said.

General manager Luke Johnson said the council would hold an extraordinary meeting on Monday night to discuss the idea andestablish a strategic plan.

Wollondilly MP Jai Rowell wanted to reassure residents that the gaol would not be built in the shire while he was the MP.

“Wollondilly will not become the dumping ground for Sydney’s criminals,” he said.

“We do not have the infrastructure and we are a growing area.

“I have fought for other campaigns but that wasnothing compared to the way I will fight to stop a gaol coming to the shire.

“The department had to narrow down potential sites but the state government has not considered the sites yet. No decision has been made.”

Contact the mayor [email protected]论坛

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The timeline: How Dubbo CYMS’ failed transfer bid played out

NO DEAL: Colby Pellow and his Dubbo CYMS teammates won’t be playing in Group 10 next year, after their bid was vetoed by the clubs. Photo digitally altered.It’s now –very appropriately – being labelled the Dubbo CYMS saga, mainly because for Fishies’chairman, the club itself, the general footy fanand the entire Western Rams region it seems like the club’s proposal toswitch from Group 11 to Group 10 has dragged on for the entire off-season thus far.
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To be fair, it just about has.

The bid was kick-started just a month after both competitions’ respective grand finals and came to a close, officially, on Wednesday night.

The proposal was officially vetoed by Group 10 clubs at a special general meeting, leaving Fishies to re-apply to play in Group 11 in 2017, however the proposal sparked discussions of change which Country Rugby League look to be taking very seriously.

Change is afoot in the region, that much is clear.

Here’s how thesaga played out, from start to finish.

OCTOBER 31, 2016:

Dubbo CYMS take a vote at annual general meeting (AGM) where the club officially decides to proceed with a proposal to switch to the Group 10 competition in 2017.Following the AGM the CYMS board members meet with the Group 11 to signal intention to put forward the proposal.

Huge news. A 10-team #Group10 comp with Dubbo CYMS … best #bush#footy comp in NSW https://t.co/gcBcfAQ9sl

— Nick McGrath (@nickmcgrath4) November 8, 2016Dubbo CYMS will continue to fight for a switch to #Group10 despite the move being rejected at today’s #Group11 AGM https://t.co/Gljo8s6y6S

— Nick Guthrie (@Nj_Guthrie) November 13, [email protected] backed #Group11’s block of Dubbo CYMS’ move. Now #Group10 gets to have its say on the matter #bushfootyhttps://t.co/bLADOp0P4J

— Nick McGrath (@nickmcgrath4) November 16, 2016BREAKING: Group 10 clubs have voted against allowing Dubbo CYMS join their competition in 2017. @[email protected][email protected]

— Ben Walker (@walkerb83) November 30, 2016EXCLUSIVE: Footage from last night’s #Group10 meeting, rejecting #DubboCYMS bid to move competitions – https://t.co/MTrRH8AtTz. #Group11

— Matt Findlay (@MRFindlay24) December 1, 2016This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on 苏州美甲培训.

More games needed: Sanders

TOUGH TIMES: State Academy coach Adam Sanders believes Tasmania’s talented youngsters need more exposure to the elite level.Tasmania’s young footballers need more exposure on the national stage, says state academy coach Adam Sanders after the poor showing at the national draft last Friday.
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No players from Tasmania were selected after 14had been taken in the four years prior. According to Sanders“things need to change”.

“We need to look at what we need to change to keep things relevant and we need to get more high level games for the boys, so they can understand the level they need to be at,’’ he told Fairfax Media.

“It is not a level playing field at the moment.

“The exposure to AFL environments that the boys in the northern (New South Wales and Queensland) academies, that is a great advantage.

“But more high level games, that is really important. You can train as much as you want, but the assessment comes in the games, as that is where they are judged by recruiters.

“That is where most of their learning will come from as far as being able to assess what they are doing well and what they are not doing well.

“Our schedule was very ordinary for the boys really. They (the Mariners)had five games to impress, where a boy in the TAC Cup can get 15 or 16 games.

“But we are fighting hard to make sure our boys get enough games in the future to show everything that they have got.

“At the moment if our kids have one or two bad games, they can have big cross put through their name quite quickly.

“Justlook at Clayton Oliver last year in the TAC Cup, where he didn’t make the Vic Country side, but had a great back-half of the year and won the Morrish Medal and got drafted at four (to Melbourne).

“I’m not sure if he was a Tassie kid, he would have got the same chance.

“Hopefully through North Melbourne, both through the Next Gen Academy and beyond, there can be that exposure to the elite environment.’’

The doom and gloom may not be long-term though with Sanders saying this year’sunder 16 group was the ‘’best he had ever coached”.

Tarryn Thomas and ChayceJones from North Launceston and Launcestonare two who could be drafted in 2018.

Former Burnie midfielder Robbie Fox was picked up by Sydney in the rookie draft.

Burnie’s Brady Grey (Fremantle) and North Hobart’s Henry Schade (Collingwood) were given second chances.

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‘Perfect festival band’

King Social: (from left) Jason Baillie, Constantine Hagiaglou, Angus Milne, Stevie Mitchell and Waqa Vananalagi.After making it to the final of Australia’s Got Talent earlier this year”city meets country” band King Social have spent a whirlwind past few months on the road.
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On the back of their national TV success, the Townsville band comprising Angus Milne (lead vocal), Stevie Mitchell (hip hop artist), Jason Baillie (lead guitar), Constantine Hagiaglou (drums), and Waqa Vananalagi (bass) have been in demand.

Apart from their pick of gigs, their songs shot up the Australian iTunes music charts following their grand final performance.

Two of their albums Big Man and It Goes Around also shot into the top 10.

The Australia’s Got Talent judges had showered the band with compliments throughout their performances on the series.

Jack Black was amazed by their ‘‘eclectic mix of styles’’.

‘‘I’ve never really heard that combo before; it’s like start off with a little Pink Floyd, then it went into a little Linkin Park and a little Bob Marley. Very cool, man – very original,” Black said.

Kelly Osbourne dubbed them ‘‘a motley crew of amazingness’’, Ian ‘Dicko’ Dickson saying they’d be a “perfect festival band” on the international stage and Sophie Monk declaring her love for resident hip-hop artist Stevie Mitchell.

‘‘It’s a great thing to feel so much love and enthusiasm coming from something we’ve created,” Mitchell said.

‘‘We’ve felt it from audiences in north Queensland for a few years now, but to know that it transcends our region and resonates with listeners all over the country is just awesome.’’

Front man Angus Milne said there had been huge demand for King Social to mount a national tour.

‘‘We’ve been invited to perform at dozens of festivals, our social media has blown up and we can’t keep up with the orders for CDs. It’s crazy,’’ he said.

Mitchell admitted he was initially reluctant to audition for the show.

“I actually had an argument with Angus about going on it at the start, but at the end of the day I really enjoyed it and it’s been nothing but positivity from everybody,” he said.

Since forming in 2013, the five-piece outfit has been gaining traction. Their first EP and music video It Goes Around was released in 2013; with the title track and Whiskey and my Gun both topping the Triple J Unearthed charts.

King Social will playthe Miranda Hotel on Sunday, December 11.This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on 苏州美甲培训.